US Chamber: NY Wind Projects Delayed

According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, its new Project No Project report

assesses the broad range of energy projects that are being stalled, stopped, or outright killed nationwide due to “Not In My Back Yard” (NIMBY) activism, a broken permitting process and a system that allows limitless challenges by opponents of development.

The study is nationwide in scope and discusses energy projects generally. New York wind projects which, per U.S. Chamber of Commerce, are unnecessarily stalled are:

  • Adirondack Wind Energy Park, Gore Mountain
  • Alabama Ledge Wind Farm
  • Cape Wyckoff Wind Project
  • Allegany Wind Farm Project
  • Hardscrabble Wind Farm
  • Horse Creek Wind Farm
  • Jericho Rise Wind Farm
  • Jones Beach Wind Farm
  • Jordanville Wind Farm
  • Marble River Wind Farm
  • Prattsburgh Wind Farm

What is needed, according to the Chamber, is

a careful consideration of how all these permitting obstacles and uncertainties and time delays can be addressed so as to speed up the processing, consideration, approval decisions, and development of many of the job creatingprojects whose progress has so far been denied.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce report, Project No Project — Progress Denied: The Potential Economic Impact of Permitting Challenges Facing Proposed Energy Projects

Albany Times Union article

Testimony on Wind Power: Opportunities and Impediments

From:

Testimony on Wind Power: Opportunities and Impediments
New York City Council Oversight Hearings
Committees on Environmental Protection & Technology

Nancy Anderson, Ph.D.
Executive Director, The Sallan Foundation

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Here are three opportunities a smart grid offers for wind power. First, since the power of wind is stochastic, the power-source switching capacity of a smart grid would improve reliability and service by integrating electric power from multiple sources. Second, development and deployment of electric power storage batteries would permit the seamless integration of wind into the power grid and facilitate demand management. Third, IBM is analyzing its smart grid pilot project in Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula to gain insights into customer behavior when confronted with new rate structures that vary with time of day and system wide power demand. This analysis should prove useful for making wind power consumer friendly and making regulators better informed.

N_Anderson-New-York-City-Council-Testimony_02-25-2010.pdf.

New York state wind power updates

From wind news and web sources:

New York State Gov. Paterson announced the passage of a three-way bill negotiated with the Legislature to improve net metering, which encourages the development of renewable energy systems. Net metering allows electricity customers with qualified renewable energy systems to sell excess electricity back to their local utility.

Per the Governor:

This legislation is the product of a “Net Metering Summit” that was convened by Governor Paterson last fall to facilitate an agreement between renewable energy installers and the State’s major utilities. The bill eliminates the peak load limitation on the size of non-residential solar and wind systems that are eligible to participate in the net metering program. Non-residential solar and wind systems will now be allowed up to 25 kilowatts with the interconnection charges capped at $350 and $750 for solar and wind, respectively. For systems above 25 kilowatts, up to the overall cap of 2,000 kilowatts, the customer would be responsible for the actual interconnection charges. (Office of the Governor, 2/23) (Link to NYS Assembly)

DOE releases updated New York Wind Map and Resource Potential.

Per Wind Powering America:

The Department of Energy’s Wind Program and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (in collaboration with Albany-based AWS Truewind) published a new wind resource map for the state of New York. The new wind resource map shows the predicted mean annual wind speeds at 80-m height. Presented at a spatial resolution of 2.5 km (interpolated to a finer scale for display). Areas with annual average wind speeds around 6.5 m/s and greater at 80-m height are generally considered to have suitable wind resource for wind development.

Additionally, a national dataset was produced of estimated gross capacity factor (not adjusted for losses) at a spatial resolution of 200 m and heights of 80 m and 100 m. Using AWS Truewind’s gross capacity factor data, NREL estimated the windy land area and wind energy potential in various capacity factor ranges for each state. The table (Excel 75 KW) lists the estimates of windy land area with a gross capacity of 30% and greater at 80-m height and the wind energy potential from development of the “available” windy land area after exclusions.  (Wind  Powering America, 2/19)

Jefferson County legislature reportedly opposes NYPA Lake Ontario wind proposal. (News 10 Now, 2/17)

Summary of Sullivan County Community College $2M legal dispute with wind developer. (Times Herald Record online, 2/20)

Summary of Citizen Power Alliance 2/16/2010 (anti-large scale) wind conference (CPA, 2/16)

ABA Journal’s “The War of Winds” regarding on-land wind siting challenges. Includes considerable information about industrial wind projects in New York State. Disclosure: This Wind Power Law blogger was an interviewee. (American Bar Association Journal, February 2010)

NYS and related wind power updates

FirstWind abandons plans for Prattsburgh 50-turbine project. (Stueben Courier, 1/24)

Just Energy, an energy retailer, will be purchasing power from FirstWind’s Steel Winds I wind energy project, in Lackawanna, New York. Under a five-year power purchase agreement, Just Energy will buy all of the electrical output and Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from First Wind’s Steel Winds I wind energy project. (CleanTech, 1/27)

Mitsubishi “has pulled off a come-from-behind victory in a wind turbine patent case against [Schenectady’s] General Electric (GE) in the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC).”  (Green Patent Blog, 1/27)

Michigan Public Service Commission issues Report on the Impact of Setback Requirements and Noise Limitations in Wind Zones in Michigan on January 27, 2010. This report was submitted to the Legislature in accordance with 2008 PA 295, Michigan’s Clean, Renewable, and Efficient Energy Act. The Commission

recommends that decisions regarding appropriate setback distances and noise levels should remain under the province of local planning and zoning authorities at this time. However, there is a clear need for the dissemination of current scientific information on this issue to decision-makers. (p.2)